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New Hybrids

 
2009 Model Year Hybrids

Cadillac Escalade Hybrid 2WD
Sport Utility Vehicle
Cadillac Escalade Hybrid 2WD
  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 20; Highway, 21; Combined,  20
Price
(MSRP)
$71,915

Chevrolet Silverado 15
Hybrid 2WD

Standard Pickup Truck
Chevrolet Silverado 15 Hybrid 2WD
  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 21; Highway, 22; Combined, 21
Price
(MSRP)
NA

Chevrolet Silverado 15
Hybrid 4WD

Standard Pickup Truck
Chevrolet Silverado 15 Hybrid 4WD
  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 20; Highway, 20; Combined,  20
Price
(MSRP)
NA

Chrysler Aspen HEV
Standard Pickup Truck
HEV

  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 20; Highway, 22; Combined,  21
Price
(MSRP)
$45,270

Dodge Durango HEV
Standard Pickup Truck
HEV

  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 20; Highway, 22; Combined,  21
Price
(MSRP)
$45,040

GMC Sierra 15 Hybrid 2WD
Standard Pickup Truck
Toyota Camry Hybrid
  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 21; Highway, 22; Combined,  21
Price
(MSRP)
NA

GMC Sierra 15 Hybrid 4WD
Standard Pickup Truck
Toyota Camry Hybrid
  EPA MPG Estimates
Chart: City, 20; Highway, 20; Combined,  20
Price
(MSRP)
NA

Five new hybrids are available so far for model year 2009:

  • Cadillac Escalade Hybrid - Sport utility vehicle available in 2-wheel drive with an 8-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission
  • Chevrolet Silverado 15 Hybrid - Sport utility vehicle available in 2- and 4-wheel drive with an 8-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission
  • Chrysler Aspen HEV - Sport utility vehicle with an 8-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission
  • Dodge Durango HEV - Sport utility vehicle with an 8-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission
  • GMC Sierra 15 Hybrid - Sport utility vehicle available in 2- and 4-wheel drive with an 8-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission

More Hybrids Coming Soon
Manufacturer
Model
Type
Estimated Date Available*
Ford Fusion Hybrid
Midsize Car
2009
Honda Insight
Car
2009
Lexus RX 450h
SUV
2009
Mercury Milan Hybrid
Midsize Car
2009
Ford Edge Hybrid
SUV
2009-10
Ford Five Hundred Hybrid
Large Car
2009-10
Lincoln MKX Hybrid
SUV
2009-10
Mercury Montego Hybrid
Large Car
2009-10
Mercedes-Benz ML450 Hybrid
SUV
2009
Mercedes-Benz S400 BlueHybrid
Large Car
2009
BMW X6
SUV
2010
Dodge Ram
Standard Pickup Truck
2010
Hyundai Sonata Hybrid
Large Car
2010
Porsche Cayenne Hybrid
SUV
2010
Honda Fit Hybrid
Small Station Wagon
2010-15
*Availability dates typically indicate calendar year rather than model year.

Sources: Manufacturer Web sites and reliable news sources. Updated 11/20/2008.

Note: Due to the volatile nature of the automobile industry, the information in this table is best viewed as a forecast.

Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links above are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you.

How Hybrids Get Such Great Gas Mileage

Motorweek Video:
Clean Power Drive

Motor Week Clean Power Video

It is no accident that the most fuel efficient vehicles in some classes for this model year are hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). Hybrids combine the best features of the internal combustion engine with an electric motor, and they can be configured to achieve a variety of different objectives, such as improving fuel economy, boosting performance, or providing electrical power to auxiliary loads such as power tools.

HEVs are primarily propelled by an internal combustion engine, just like conventional vehicles. However, they also convert energy normally wasted during coasting and braking into electricity, which is stored in a battery until needed by the electric motor. The electric motor is used to assist the engine when accelerating or hill climbing and in low-speed driving conditions where internal combustion engines are least efficient. Some HEVs also automatically shut off the engine when the vehicle comes to a stop and restart it when the accelerator is pressed. This prevents wasted energy from idling.

Unlike all-electric vehicles, HEVs now being offered do not need to be plugged into an external source of electricity to be recharged; conventional gasoline and regenerative braking provide all the energy the vehicle needs.

The federal government is currently offering tax incentives for HEVs and other alternative fuel vehicles. Some states also offer incentives.

 

 

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