Aquamarine Power

Green energy out of the blue

Technologies

Simple, reliable and built to survive.

Oyster® Wave Power System

Oyster® is a hydro-electric wave power converter, designed to capture the energy found in amplified surge forces in nearshore waves.  Its relative simplicity makes it extremely reliable and fault-tolerant; and gives it a number of key advantages, all of which make it cost competitive.

1. Reliable and fault tolerant
2. Competitive Cost - economies of scale and low weight to power ratio
3. Low risk installation and accessible maintenance
4. Low ecological impact High Environmental Gains
5. Maximum Efficiency and Power Output

The principle behind Oyster® is simple. The system consists of a simple steel Oscillating Wave Surge Converter, or pump, fitted with double acting water pistons, deployed near-shore in depths around 10m. Each passing wave activates the pump; which delivers high pressure water via a sub-sea pipeline to the shore. Onshore, high-pressure water is converted to electrical power using proven, conventional hydro-electric generators. The nearshore location is easy to access; and the most complex part of the system is onshore, so it is accessible 365 days a year.

The peak power generated by each Oyster® unit is between 300 and 600kw, depending on location and configuration. When deployed in multi-MW arrays; several nearshore pumps will feed a single onshore hydro-electric generator, attached to a single manifold pipeline. With the capacity to build a single onshore generating plant with an installed capacity of 21MW or higher, the economies of scale that can be achieved with the Oyster® system are clear.

The innovative design and near-shore of location Oyster® makes it capable of surviving and generating power continuously in a wide range of sea-states.

The Oyster® system has been designed to be a reliable and very cost-effective source of power.

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The Oyster® wave energy conversion system.

The full-scale Oyster® prototype has been manufactured by Isleburn at Nigg in the north of Scotland.